Browsing: Information Technology

A catchphrase from a popular reality show goes: “One day you’re in. And the next day, you’re out.” For the purposes of the show, the host is referencing fashion. But the same could be said about science. With each new discovery or advance, an old theory or idea often becomes obsolete … or at least less important. We here in the NIST public affairs office thought it might be fun to list some of the NIST-relevant scientific ideas that we think are on their way in and out in 2017. While the items on the list below may not be as monumental as the discoveries that led to this year’s Nobel Prizes, MacArthur Foundation “genius” grants or Breakthrough Prizes, we…

They say opposites attract. While my husband and I have many important things in common, we are complete opposites in one area. He’s a “risk taker,” and me … well, not so much. Rather than being labeled as “risk averse,” I prefer the term “caution giver.” I’m a federal employee. I come from a long line of public servants. I bet that my ancestors probably worked in the service of the king or queen, or at least the local earl or baron, before they came to the U.S. My husband is different story. He’s a small-business owner. Whereas I tend to worry and ask a lot of “what if?” questions, he likes the challenge of being in command and building…

After four years of research and development, NIST has published a groundbreaking new security guideline that addresses the longstanding problem of how to engineer trustworthy, secure systems—systems that can provide continuity of capabilities, functions, services, and operations during a wide range of disruptions, threats, and other hazards. In fact, I think that Special Publication 800-160, Systems Security Engineering, is the most important publication that I have been associated with in my two decades of service with NIST. I want to share what led me to this conclusion. The Current Landscape The United States, and every other industrialized nation, is experiencing explosive growth in information technology. These technological innovations have given us access to computing and communications capabilities unparalleled in the…

Those of us who work for small businesses regularly perform duties outside our job description. I’ve experienced the “all hands on deck” approach that drives the day-to-day operations of many small and midsize businesses. This approach fittingly applies to cybersecurity, which is no longer a responsibility that can or should be solely reserved for IT. I was hired by SDN Communications to serve in a government relations and regulatory capacity, but the position soon evolved to include cybersecurity and risk management. Prior to joining SDN, I worked in the U.S. Senate on cybersecurity and telecommunications policy. In one of my last duties as a staffer, I briefed Sen. Tim Johnson about the Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2014. The measure cemented…

Aristotle once said, “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.” Two gears together can accomplish much more than one gear alone. And when you connect multiple systems together, whether of gears or computers, you can achieve even greater functionality and performance. We call these “systems of systems,” or SoS, and you can find them everywhere. Hospitals, for example. In a hospital, there are individual computer systems for patient management, pharmacies, laboratories, imaging, and telemetry. Included in this network are the individual machines used to diagnose and treat patients such as MRIs and pacemakers. Hospitals are connecting more and more of these machines to their wireless networks so that doctors and nurses can access and control them using…

1 2 3 4